How to Deal With a Narcissist in Divorce

by on Aug. 20, 2019

Divorce & Family Law Divorce & Family Law  Divorce Divorce & Family Law  Child Custody 

Summary: Divorce attorney Micheal Bouldin, describes how to deal with a narcissist, or person with narcissistic personality disorder, through the divorce process. Involvement of professionals, use of history and litigation versus mediation and negotiation are all discussed. Also discussed is what to expect when dividing assets, valuing businesses and custody matters.

Narcissist is an often used, and generally overused, word in the divorce process. Nearly everyone has some narcissistic features, however very few people fit the medical/mental health definition of a narcissist.

A narcissist is defined as: a person who has an excessive interest in or admiration of themselves. People refer to narcissists as those who think the world revolves around them. The clinical definition of Narcissistic personality disorder — one of several types of personality disorders — is a mental condition in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance, a deep need for excessive attention and admiration, troubled relationships, and a lack of empathy for others.

This leads to the common question, “What is the difference between a contested and uncontested divorce?” That answer is simple, one the parties agree and the other they do not and must have a judge decide some or all of their disputed issues.

The underlying question is much more complex: Why do some people agree on terms and others fight?

There are many ways to deal with a person with excessive narcissistic personality features. It is important to share with your attorney if you believe that your spouse (ex-spouse) has these features and to develop a game plan in how to deal with them.

Using an attorney with extensive experience in dealing with a variety of litigants, especially narcissists, is helpful in not only handling the case, but also attempting to settle, deciding when to go to trial, and dealing with that person in the future. If you have children, the divorce is not the end of having to deal with the other parent.

If you have concerns and wish to discuss, contact Michael Bouldin at 859-581-6453 (581-MIKE) or email mike@bouldinlawfirm.com to schedule an appointment.

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