Dalton Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Georgia


Katherine Lindsey O'Gwin

Wills & Probate, Collaborative Law, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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L. Hugh Kemp

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  63 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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G. Gargandi Vaughn

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Robert Adam Cowan

Pharmaceutical Product, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Business Organization, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years
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Jesse Raymond Bates

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Robert Douglas Jenkins

Entertainment, Family Law, Felony, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Curtis Alan Kleem

Litigation, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert Gregg Mccurry

Landlord-Tenant, Real Estate, Federal Trial Practice, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

James E. Wilbanks

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Maxine Cindy Morris

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION

A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equit... (more...)
A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equitable means equal, but in practice it often means that the higher wage earner gets two-thirds to the lower wage earner's one-third. If a spouse obtains a fault divorce, the 'guilty' spouse may receive less than his equitable share upon divorce.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.