Norwalk Family Law Lawyer, Connecticut

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Hector J. Gonzalez-Velez Lawyer

Hector J. Gonzalez-Velez

Immigration, Deportation, Visa, Family Law, Divorce

Mr. Hector Gonzalez-Velez is an attorney concentrating in immigration and nationality law. He is admitted to practice in the State of Connecticut and ... (more)

Richard G. Kent Lawyer

Richard G. Kent

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Prenuptial Agreements

Richard Kent is a practicing lawyer in the state of Connecticut.

Mark Daniel Sherman Lawyer

Mark Daniel Sherman

Criminal, Domestic Violence & Neglect, DUI-DWI, Juvenile Law, Misdemeanor

Mark Sherman is a lawyer in Stamford who focuses on Criminal Defense cases. He has tried cases involving civil litigation, Connecticut college & unive... (more)

Antoinette R. Kaine

Labor Law, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Gregory S. Kimmel

Labor Law, Family Law, Criminal, Corporate, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sheila S. Abbruzzese

Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Cynthia R. Bernard

Car Accident, Personal Injury, Family Law, Residential Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Katherine Thompson Blakeslee

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Collaborative Law, Conveyancing
Status:  In Good Standing           

Wendy E. Prince

Mediation, Prenuptial Agreements, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher M. Silva

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Corporate, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

CONNIVANCE

A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adul... (more...)
A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adultery, and if he tried to divorce her for her behavior, she could assert his connivance as a defense.

TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDER (TRO)

An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court ... (more...)
An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court holds a second hearing where the other side can tell his story and the court can decide whether to make the TRO permanent by issuing an injunction. Although a TRO will often not stop an enraged spouse from acting violently, the police are more willing to intervene if the abused spouse has a TRO.

STEPCHILD

A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological ... (more...)
A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological offspring. Under the Uniform Probate Code, followed in some states, a stepchild belongs in the same class as a biological child and will inherit property left 'to my children.' In other states, a stepchild is not treated like a biological child unless he or she can prove that the parental relationship was established when he or she was a minor and that adoption would have occurred but for some legal obstacle.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE

Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and aba... (more...)
Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and abandoned refrigerators have all qualified as attractive nuisances.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Kerrigan v. Commissioner of Public Health

... they share the same interest in having a family and raising their children in a loving and supportive environment. Indeed, the legislature itself recognized the overriding similarities between same sex and opposite sex couples when, upon passage of the civil union law, it granted ...

Gershman v. Gershman

... The defendant claims that the trial court improperly concluded that he had dissipated family assets. More specifically, the defendant asserts that his conduct did not constitute dissipation as a matter of law, because dissipation requires a finding that one spouse engaged in ...

Maturo v. Maturo

... plaintiff's share of the marital assets consisted of the mortgage free $2.55 million marital home and the bulk of the family's liquid assets ... defendant to maintain comprehensive medical insurance benefits for the plaintiff at his expense for the maximum period allowed by law and to ...