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Missouri Workers' Compensation for Neck Injuries

by James M. Hoffmann on Apr. 07, 2015

Employment Workers' Compensation Accident & Injury Employment  Employee Rights 

Summary: While some work-related neck injuries are minor and resolve in a few days or weeks, others can be serious with life-altering consequences.

While some work-related neck injuries are minor and resolve in a few days or weeks, others can be serious with life-altering consequences.

Missouri workers are prone to various types of injuries at the workplace and some types of injuries are more common than others. Neck injuries are a commonly reported workplace injury. While some neck injuries are minor and resolve in a few days or weeks, others can be serious and may last for a long time. Some serious neck injuries may even be permanent with life-altering consequences.

Repetitive Motion Neck Injuries

Work-related neck injuries can result from a variety of factors. Some work-related neck injuries are caused by repetitive motion of neck muscles and are known as repetitive motion injuries. Workers who perform the same task continuously and repeatedly or perform tasks that require a limited range of motion, are at a higher risk of repetitive motion injuries, including several types of neck injuries. In case a neck injury is a result of repetitive motion, the injured worker may not experience any symptoms before the injury is severe enough to cause significant pain and discomfort.

Causes of Work-Related Neck Injuries

  • tripping over objects while moving around at the workplace
  • slip and fall accidents
  • objects falling from a height at the workplace
  • repetitive motion
  • improper manual handling

Common Types of Work-Related Neck Injuries

  • pinched nerves
  • whiplash
  • herniated or bulging discs in the neck
  • tears or strains in the soft tissue such as tendons, muscles, or ligaments of the neck
  • broken neck, which can eventually lead to paraplegia if the spinal cord is also damaged

Workers At Risk for Neck Injuries

Some classes of workers are a greater risk of neck injuries because of the nature of their jobs. These occupations include:

  • truck drivers
  • construction workers
  • office workers
  • massage therapists
  • workers who sit for extended periods of time
  • workers who lifts heavy objects
  • health care professionals

The outlook for a neck injury depends on its severity. While minor neck injuries, such as those involving damage to tendons, ligaments, tissues, or muscles are fairly common and resolve easily, more severe neck injuries can lead to complications such as prolapsed spinal discs, paraplegia, and even quadriplegia.

If you have suffered a work-related neck injury, you may be eligible to receive medical and wage loss benefits under the Missouri workers' compensation system. Even if your pre-existing neck injury has been worsened by your work conditions, you may still receive workers' compensation benefits. An experienced Missouri workers' compensation attorney can protect your legal rights and help you with each step of your claim's process. Call The Law Office of James M. Hoffmann at (314) 361-4300 for a free case evaluation.

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