Farmington Criminal Lawyer, Michigan

Sponsored Law Firm


Valenton  Vulaj Lawyer

Valenton Vulaj

VERIFIED
Estate, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Elder Law

Valenton Vulaj is a practicing lawyer in the state of Michigan. Attorney Vulaj received his J.D. from the University of Detroit Mercy in 2000.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-729-2161

Robert D. Mouradian Lawyer

Robert D. Mouradian

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Business, Employment, Criminal

Robert D. Mouradian received his undergraduate degree in political science from the University of Michigan in 1974. Robert D. Mouradian graduated f... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-697-1561

Ezra N. Goldman Lawyer

Ezra N. Goldman

VERIFIED
Criminal, Business, Litigation, Accident & Injury, Motor Vehicle
A Full Service Law Firm

Our law office is more than just a law office. We have immediate access to CPAs, tax and insurance professionals. Our web of contacts includes docto... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-879-4170

Susan Leigh Brown

Age Discrimination, Criminal, Americans with Disabilities Act , Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Lisa D. Stern

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Sarah E. Blalock

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Grand Jury Proceedings
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kevin S. Oliver

Dispute Resolution, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Melissa A. Cox

Farms, Child Support, Adoption, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel Hajji

DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Arnold Reed

Employment, Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Messages from all messaging and voice technologies including Email, Text, Phone, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Messages from all messaging and voice technologies including Email, Text, Phone, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Farmington Criminal Lawyers and Farmington Criminal Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Criminal practice areas such as DUI-DWI, Expungement, Felony, Misdemeanor, RICO Act, White Collar Crime, Traffic and Juvenile Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (D.A.)

A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewi... (more...)
A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewing police arrest reports, deciding whether to bring criminal charges against arrested people and prosecuting criminal cases in court. The D.A. may also supervise other attorneys, called Deputy District Attorneys or Assistant District Attorneys. In some states a District Attorney may be called a Prosecuting Attorney, County Attorney or State's Attorney. In the federal system, the equivalent to the D.A. is a United States Attorney. The country has many U.S. Attorneys, each appointed by the President, who supervise regional offices staffed with prosecutors called Assistant United States Attorneys.

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

ACCESSORY

Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An acces... (more...)
Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An accessory is usually not physically present during the crime. For example, hiding a robber who is being sought by the police might make you an 'accessory after the fact' to a robbery. Compare accomplice.

BAIL

The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all requi... (more...)
The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all required court appearances. The amount of bail is determined by the local bail schedule, which is based on the seriousness of the offense. The judge can increase the bail if the prosecutor convinces him that the defendant is likely to flee (for example, if he has failed to show up in court in the past), or he can decrease it if the defense attorney shows that the defendant is unlikely to run (for example, he has strong ties to the community by way of a steady job and a family).

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

People v. Sargent

... PER CURIAM. We granted leave to appeal in this case to consider whether offense variable 9 (number of victims) (OV 9) can be scored using uncharged acts that did not occur during the same criminal transaction as the sentencing offenses. ...

People v. Petri

... Following a jury trial, defendant was convicted of second-degree criminal sexual conduct, MCL 750.520c(1)(a) (sexual contact with a person under 13), and was sentenced as a second-offense habitual offender, MCL 769.10, to imprisonment for a minimum of 14 years and 10 ...

People v. Horn

... A jury convicted defendant of kidnapping, MCL 750.349, and four counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct, MCL 750.520b. The trial court sentenced defendant as a second-offense habitual offender, MCL 769.10, to five concurrent sentences of 40 to 60 years in prison. ...