East Brunswick Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, New Jersey

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Alan  Cosner Lawyer

Alan Cosner

VERIFIED
Estate, Elder Law, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Tax
Accounting Major, IRS Agent, LLM, NYU.

Our attorneys’ academic and professional credentials are outstanding. Alan G. Cosner, the Firm’s Managing Partner, holds a Master of Law degree in... (more)

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732-937-8000

Barbara K Lewinson Lawyer

Barbara K Lewinson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Personal Injury, Criminal, Child Custody

Barbara K. Lewinson has practiced law in New Jersey for over 30 years, having been admitted to the Bar in December 1981. She has a general practic... (more)

Irwin D. Tubman Lawyer

Irwin D. Tubman

VERIFIED
Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate

Attorney Irwin D. Tubman has been helping New Jersey clients resolve difficult legal problems for more than 35 years. Mr. Tubman believes that info... (more)

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CONTACT

732-254-1330

Frank  Tournour Lawyer

Frank Tournour

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law

Mr. Tournour was admitted to practice law in the state of Pennsylvania in 1991 and in the state of New Jersey and U.S. District Court for the state of... (more)

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Ayanna Y Countee Lawyer

Ayanna Y Countee

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Traffic, Divorce & Family Law

Ayanna Y. Countee is a Certified Civil Trial Attorney at Garces, Grabler & LeBrocq with the firm’s Personal Injury department. Ayanna specializes in... (more)

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CONTACT

800-872-3010

Robert S. Popescu Lawyer

Robert S. Popescu

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Business, Employment, Federal Appellate Practice, Complex Litigation

ROBERT POPESCU, Esq. graduated with a BA degree from Montclair State University cum laude. Mr. Popescu received his Juris Doctor degree from Seton Hal... (more)

John B. Fabriele Lawyer

John B. Fabriele

Criminal, White Collar Crime, Misdemeanor, Felony, Domestic Violence & Neglect

John Fabriele is a lawyer in East Brunswick who focuses on Criminal Defense cases. He has tried cases involving DUI, gun crimes, sex crimes, domestic ... (more)

Barnett E. Hoffman

Arbitration, Collaborative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rosalind Westlake

Adoption, Corporate, Business Organization, Commercial Leasing
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lisa M. Vignuolo

Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Education, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

SURVIVORS BENEFITS

An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disabil... (more...)
An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disability benefits.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

IN CAMERA

Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from t... (more...)
Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from the courtroom. Proceedings are often held in camera to protect victims and witnesses from public exposure, especially if the victim or witness is a child. There is still, however, a record made of the proceeding, typically by a court stenographer. The judge may decide to seal this record if the material is extremely sensitive or likely to prejudice one side or the other.

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