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1-10 of 33 matches. Page 1 of 4.
Church & State: Blurring the Lines
Church and state interaction is inevitable. However, limits to this convergence exist. Under the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion.”
On Legal Writing
For some, the word "appellate" triggers a Pavlovian-like response: move on to something else. Appellate litigation is equated with writing, which many lawyers dislike.
Review, A Lawyer’s Guide to Writing
Authors of legal-writing books face an unenviable task – discovering originality in an area almost devoid of it.
The Perils of Unpaid Internships
Unpaid interns are making headlines for their lawsuits demanding compensation. As courts grapple with whether unpaid internships violate minimum wage laws, all businesses - including law firms - should consider whether their unpaid internship program warrants revision.
DOES THE CONSTITUTION REALLY MEAN SEPARATION BETWEEN CHURCH AND STATE
Defending Religious Freedom is evolving as a Major issue. Hobby Lobby; the Tennessee student suspended for saying "God bless you;" the Houston Mayor subpoenaing Pastor's SERMONS. But does the Constitution actually state "Separation of Church and State?"
Nikki Woods, Esq. - New Attorney Announcement
Nikki Woods, Esq. to join Law Office of Peter D. Hoffman, PC
Holmes, Watson and The Riddle of Harmless Error
Appellate Standards of Review; understanding Harmless Error
CARDOZO'S CANAL, AND THE COW THAT JUMPED OVER THE MOON
Further understanding of appellate standards of review. Finding a way to get de novo review for your appeal.
The Great Marijuana Divide Infographic
There has been controversy about the smoking of marijuana in the US for decades. American support for legalizing marijuana has changed a great deal, according to the statistics in the graphic below.
What Happens to an Attorney's Clients Should the Attorney Die or Become Incapacitated?
Many solo practitioners and small law firms spend countless hours helping others map out and plan for “what if” scenarios, but not enough plan for the “what if” scenarios that may affect them, their law firm and their clients should they suddenly die or become incapacitated.
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